Jenny J. Richards

FDA opens door to rapid, at-home screening for COVID-19

The Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday opened the door to COVID-19 testing that could be fast, cheap, and handled entirely at home — if companies don’t find the rules too burdensome.

Routine screening of people who don’t know they have COVID-19 could transform the fight against the disease.

“These types of tests will be a game-changer in our fight against COVID-19 and will be crucial as the nation looks toward reopening,” FDA Commissioner Dr. Stephen Hahn said in a statement announcing how the agency will approve at-home tests.

So far, the FDA hasn’t allowed anyone to sell tests for at-home use.

Lab tests to detect the coronavirus are accurate, but they’re often restricted to people who have COVID-19 symptoms. It often takes days to get results — by which point the person may have already infected others.

Other tests are fast, but so expensive they’re unlikely to be used

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How to Avoid Cultural Appropriation in Design

Photo credit: Alice Morgan
Photo credit: Alice Morgan

From House Beautiful

The shoes were tiny, brightly colored, embroidered with flowers and birds, and embellished with metallic thread. Interior designer Noz Nozawa’s client had a collection of them proudly displayed on the fireplace mantel of her San Francisco home. But why would baby shoes have heels? “That’s what’s so horrifying,” says Nozawa. “If you didn’t know what you were looking at, they look like fancy little Asian baby’s shoes.”

She realized that her client, who is white, was a collector of lotus shoes, used for the Chinese practice of footbinding, which lasted for 1,000 years. “It’s a relic of a past time that wasn’t expressly meant to oppress and mutilate women, but that’s exactly what it did,” Nozawa says. She left them out when she photographed the home for her portfolio.

In Houston, where Cindy Aplanalp often builds and designs prayer rooms for her Hindu

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Ask yourself 6 questions about aging in place

Many homes in the U.S. are not what you describe as age-friendly.

Case in point: Of the 28.5 million households with an older adult, more than one-quarter (28%) reported difficulty using some aspect of the home, according to a U.S. Census Bureau report

Given that the demand for homes with aging-accessible features will rise as baby boomers age and the size of the older population grows, now might be a good time to assess your home.

“The need for aging-accessible homes is one of both health and economics, as fall-related injuries impose costly tolls on older people,” the report stated. “Coupled with the growing size of the older population, it is necessary to consider how the functional design of homes may affect older people’s ability to live safely and comfortably.”

So, can you age in place? Sandra Timmermann, a nationally-recognized gerontologist and the founder of the MetLife Mature Market

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Gigi Hadid divides fans with ‘upsetting’ home decor: ‘Ruined my day’

On July 26, supermodel and mom-to-be Gigi Hadid took to Instagram to give fans a glimpse of her newly renovated New York City apartment.

“Spent all of last year designing and curating my passion project / dream spot,” she wrote about her space. “Of course it all came together right before quarantining out of the city … but I’m excited for the time I’ll get to spend enjoying all the special corners that were made with a lil help from some of my favorite creatives … who embraced my ideas and didn’t call me crazy.”

READ MORE: Thousands of Amazon reviews rave about these reliable cleaning products

Hadid’s “favorite creatives” might not have called her crazy when she asked for a bowl of pool balls in the kitchen or a giant mechanical pencil statue in the foyer, but many fans sure are.

Credit: Instagram/Gigi Hadid
Credit: Instagram/Gigi Hadid

In a now-viral tweet,

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